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you want to share with us some of your experiences? well, my experience has been that in-in-in the addiction itself, we're addicted to a drug, to a substance, and that the-the problem with that is that there's a problem within us that causes us to want to use a substance to hide from that-from-from, hide from the problem. and that my path was that there was a problem in me that i'd never took a look at. and so i chose to use crack, whatever it was, or other substances to-to medicate that, until i came to the point to realize that i was sick and tired of being sick and tired of following that path, of living that way which had led me to homelessness and other things like that, that i said well, you know, what can i do? and at that point i had very little answers. but as-as-as my word says, i just needed the faith of a mustard seed to realize that i couldn't do it, if somebody else could do it, so i-i-i walked many, many miles to a rehab center. what was that aha moment? you know there usually comes a moment along the path of someone that has an addiction that finally-you k
and figuring out the ways they can use the packing facilities for canning the tomatoes from the local farmer and having the delivery come to the university. and if they can be doing that research on it, then sharing that is a beautiful thing. >> couple of questions, has it been difficult to spread your philosophy to urban communities and what solutions, more specifically, can you offer to help education poor communities and support those students? if money is used as the excuse and easily used in declining resources, how do we realistically break through? >> we start growing things on every available lot. >> i wasn't joking. just think of what happened during world war ii. i grew up on my parent's victory garden. they were asked to do this as a part of the war effort. they saved all of their tin cans. they kept their milk cartons. they turned out the lights. it is the way you were brought up. it is free food when you grow it. every time i see a vacant lot, i think my god, how much food can be grown. there are beautiful people doing research on ecology action with john jevens. how much food c
was the building. we were in a building that had long outlived its usefulness as a place for residents to live. it was no longer consistent with any medicare or medicaid rules. we were the only facility left in the country running open wards. we were told we would not be allowed any longer by both the federal and state authorities. it was a place where, while the care was wonderful, the building did not fit any modern earthquake standards. where privacy was insufficient to support human dignity. where people did not have a place to store their stuff. where people did not have a window to look out on. where we had to have wards that had closing doors because there was not that easy access to the outside. here we had a vibrant set of people -- residents, nurses, doctors, attendants -- but what we lacked was a space that was equal to them. with that, i hope all of you -- looking around the crowd, so many of you did to make this reality. derek parker set the vision of every room with a window. whether it is one of you who voted for this, or one of our wonderful residents who has been a volunteer h
want to take that moment and reflect on his contribution. let us also take a moment to reflect on the doctor. we are blessed. you do not want to be the best of the best. you want to be only the one who does what you do. his commitment to public health in san francisco is second to none. he has done an extraordinary job leading by example. this is a city that is doing things that no other city in the united states of america could even imagine doing, things that even when we had all the resources in the world and all the capacity, things that cities could not do. this commitment to an acute care, facility, a skilled nursing facility -- what county is having a ribbon cutting on a new nursing facility in this modern age? and what city and county can lay claim to comprehensive universal health care, regardless of pre- existing conditions, regardless of your ability to pay? dr. mitch kastz has been the architect of all of this. thank you for your leadership. there is the old play towline that if there is any hope for the future of those with lanterns will pass them on to others. let
to bring this together, to bring us all together -- she is the founder and chair of the apa heritage celebration committee. come on out, claudine. [applause] >> welcome to the 2010 celebration of asian pacific american heritage month. on behalf of the celebration committee, all the names are here. which includes representatives from city officials and executives from over 10 @ nicholas in the asian-pacific american family. i welcome you here. -- over 10 representatives. with the demographics we have in san francisco, everyone should be and can be celebrated as asian-pacific american heritage month. i cannot agree more. but looking around the room tonight, it is really a true do like that so many friends from the communities, from all communities, from all walks of life have decided to join us for our celebration. and it really means a lot to us. the truth of the matter is in a diverse city like san francisco where we call home, not only every month can be asian pacific american heritage month, every month can be african american heritage month. every month can be seen the demise of.
. come up to the party and stay here with us. >> who says asians don't have rhythm? that's it,on't have rhythm? that's it, ladies and gentlemen, for the kickoff performance for asian-pacific american heritage month. thank you very much for coming. we hope to see you at the reception. good night! >> the mayor, the office of workforce development, kick off a new program which is to engage some of the artists in reinvigorating the streetscapes. organized in partnership with neighborhood based economic development organizations, the art in storefronts taps into the credible creativity of the artist community to help improve the quality of life and the business climate in poor neighborhoods. the tenderloin, central market, they view, and the mission's 24 st.. at the launch party, the mayor released the first of 13 projects located on taylor and market street. we were there to capture the celebration and to get a closer look at the newly transformed storefront. >> we have an analyst at saying, you know what, we get it. if we close out and we put some plywood, we know it will have gr
not be leaving. this is our home. and it is very important to us. we are already here. but please come back and visit us frequently. this wonderful new laguna honda would not exist without you. i just want to add a personal note. my younger sister, emily, was a resident here for many more years than i have been. she was greatly loved. we lost her recently. i would like to dedicate this speech to her and remembered her, as many of the residents do, with great fondness and affection. thank you all. [applause] >> i would like to invite you all nowi that good enough? this is a participatory ribbon cutting. it requires nothing more complicated than this. i will ask you to count down, not up. upon conclusion, we will applaud the great works of turner construction, the dedicated men and women who are still toiling inside to get this project completed, which begs the question when will the residents be moving in that? there is an easy answer -- soon. [laughter] [crowd chants a countdown] [applause] go ahead in an orderly manner. [music] hello, i'm ivette torres and welcome to another edit
to it you have to use the one in the street. pg and e put all the meters outside the houses in a lot of the neighborhoods, these are pretty easy to get to. they are easy to find. if you can find the little round circle in the sidewalk. if you look directly at the house you will find this meter and this shut off on the ground floor. in is a closeup of the shut off. in is the wrench i recommend you you use it for other things. they are cheap and they will work. this is great because you can use it somewhere else if you have to. an adjustable open end wrench. a diagram are off/on. shut off valve. another shut off coming out of the dirt. another problem you have a wrench that doesn't quite work. we like to leave the wrenches next to the shut off. tie is off with a wire. we will cover it again. when you shut off the gas. if the build's's collapsed good idea to shut it off there are probably pipes broken and you can have a gas leak. if you smell gas, leave the /tkaors open, don't operate electric switches that will cause a spark. don't use your cell phone. use the cell phone outside or a n
the conservation of the water is an energy used in this building, and enhance the co2 emission reductions of this building. mayor, thank you for walking the walk as well as talking the talk. it is something to be proud of, leed-certified. to all the care givers and all the volunteers who make up the family of residents, to express our appreciation for your long hours and for your selfless service, and know that the battles that senator yee and assembly men andiano and i are putting in sacramento right now -- if we let governor have his -- if we let the governor have his way to eliminate government support services and to eliminate government general fund support for health services, people who are now able to be in this community would no longer be able to. we would need over 10 laguna honda's. we are not going to let arnold schwarzenegger have his way so that people can have the option of dignity. thank you all for joining us today. [applause] >> san francisco has a great elected city family. i want to acknowledge the president of the board of supervisors, president david chu, supervisor
connors. thank you and john predecessor stole away from us, michael lane. thank you, michael, wherever you are. lastly, my personal reflection on this building. this building, to me, is truly a monument to the tremendous capacity of generosity in the heart of sentences go. the voters of san francisco in their great willingness to support this facility will always have this hospital as a sign of their willingness to help those most in need. these neighborhoods that surround this facility, i think, consider laguna honda at their private treasure. we really do look at this hospital as our own. we love this hospital. we have great care and great love for the residents of this hospital. on behalf of the neighboring residents, to all of the current residents of the hospital, this is for you. we are thrilled we were able to do this for you. thank you, everyone. [applause] >> the work of the health department would never be possible without its commission. the commission is the governing body. you have been around to this project long enough to see some fantastic commissioners who have also gone o
containers. it was important for us that we made this project for the place, of the place. what i mean by that is participants would also used repurchased materials. >> we will be speaking to one of the artists that you selected. what excited you about his idea? >> have many things. first of all, i am a fan of his architecture. because of that creativity, i knew that he could come up with something unique. i love the fact that he was specifically addressing the landscape around here, and it was also about the human interaction with this place. >> what are your expectations with the people coming to presidio habitat? >> we really hope people will come with their family, dogs, and come back a number of times the works will change over the year. the feedback we are getting is you cannot do all of them on one visit. it is really better to come back and have different experiences. >> thank you. i am with mark jensen of jensen architect. he was one of the architects to be chosen to do the presidio habitat. when you heard about this project, what inspired you about that call? >> our inspirati
for the health that it gives. so it seemed to be a natural plant to share. >> though they may look the same to us, there are actually about 400 varieties of cacti, and while not all are edible, john does grow an edible variety called nopalea grande. during peak season, he is shipping upwards of 3,000 pounds of the plant at a time, and while some go to pet-food stores for tortoises to enjoy, most of the plants here are used for human consumption. so john has a grading system he uses when harvesting. >> we have several different grades, depending on what the consumer wants. this is grade-a, tender, beautiful, exquisite, baby-vegetable cactus, shipped with ultimate care in packing. this would be grade-b, also for the gourmand, but a little larger. not as much packing material in there to protect it. this is a good grace-c, very good for the ultimate consumer, easy to prepare and clean. you've got a lot of food value per leaf. >> grown on hillsides with plenty of sun and well-drained soil, the plants love to grow close together, and from planting to harvest, it can take months even years tc get full
the fire. how many people have used a fire extinguisher before. >> may be 10 percent of you. by the end of the week you will be putting out a fire with a fire extinguisher. you don't want to learn out to house an extinguisher when they big fire is in front of you. when you turn off your natural gas and water. hazardous materials will be talked about next week. 35-40 percent of you. you will find out that all of you have hazardous material in your home. the third week is disaster medicine. you, going into a room spending 45 seconds on one person into 3 life saving techniques. by the fourth we we will teach you as search and rescuers how to keep yourself safe by identifying safe and none safe building to go into. sometimes objects are too heavy for you to liftoff of a body. we will teach you privying which will use anything you have, wood or cement blocks so you is see that people can lift heavy objects off of people. now, you have to have a plan. every program needs to have a plan. we can't say, here are your skills. class 6, after half an hour we will split you into teams of 10 people
' because we are not doing our part to help change it. if that is true, i want jerry to tell us whether or not he agrees with that assessment. >> do you agree with that? >> jonathan said something that i absolutely agree with. that is the media reflects what the public wants. in my view, the media, in general, feed a voracious appetite for vengeance by an informed public. often influenced by fear, prejudice, and ignorance. i think one of the reasons criminal defense lawyers argued so poorly is people do not understand the source of crime. they want simple, quick responses to a complicated long- term solutions. you cannot fight crime by doing what the governor is doing, cutting social services and building new prisons. [applause] you do not have to be a rocket scientist to understand. all of us who have been involved in the criminal-justice system know where people who commit crimes come from. they are poor people, people of color, victims of abuse, the mentally ill, people with substance abuse problems. there are the people that fall through the cracks of society. but that is the public
both addiction problems, substance use problems and co-occurring mental health psychiatric disorders. mountain manor provides a whole range of services for youth and that's really important, that it takes more than one kind of approach to try to get to adolescent drug problems. so we do substance abuse counseling, we do mental health therapy, we do educational programming, we do psychiatric treatment, we do medical treatment with pediatricians, we involve parents, we work with kids on an out-patient level and an in-patient level and everything in between because one size doesn't fit all. and we try to squeeze all sorts of different approaches to tailor make treatment to kids. what's very important is the continuum of care. they come in, they get stabilized in residential treatment and they step down to what we have as a partial hospitalization program, which is 6 hours, 5 days a week. that'll go for a week or two, that steps down to 4 days a week, 3 hours a night. and if they do well, they don't relapse, they're talking, they're working on these skills in the actual environment where
child. my father used to take me to the court house to watch the lawyers practiced law when i was 8 years old. i believe in the mission. i believe -- i am a true believer. i think those images influence children. we have one here in the front row. some to serve as prosecutors first and then become criminal defense attorneys, but many of us want to defend the constitution and those rights from the very beginning, from jump. i think we do not just me to believe it in our hearts, we need to profess it publicly. i do believe, though, that jerry is right. it is not enough to talk about it amongst ourselves. it is a larger public dialogue that needs to happen in terms of the resources, the jury pool, and that means talking to people who identify more with victims. we now there are one in 100 people behind bars. that means one in 100 people knows somebody connected to the criminal justice system. that is a tremendous opportunity for us. that means there are people in every sector of society who identify with our cause. that is when people start to understand the import of the public defend
of $10,000. [applause] >> what is significant about the program is the way it is set out allows us to treat the artworks that have the most need, the ones that our conservative have pointed out as the most vulnerable as opposed to ones that might be the most popular were the most miserable -- the most visible. >> it is an opportunity for the public to get involved with these art works located in their backyard and ultimately belong to them. >> i want to do something for the community, just giving back what the community has done for me. it is corny to say, but it is true. it really is what it is. that i would be able to see more pieces cleanup. >>" will check back in the future and see the fruits of conservation and revitalization efforts. if you would find out more or donate to the art carethe donate to the art carethe artsfartcommission.org. >> welcome to coulterwire. the san francisco arts commission and department of public works has joined forces by battling graffiti by launching a new program called street smarts. the program connects established artist with private property
buddy, a friend -- i do not know how many times john burton wrote us about this, but we thank you for your persistence on this. let me just take a moment to thank the person that i have called one of the greatest secretaries of transportation, is not the greatest -- ray lahood. you need to know about this man. he knows i feel this way about him. when you called ray, you cannot make small talk, you just get to the point. he knew about this because i remember i was with him when we were announcing another grant. he said, don't worry, i know about the transbay terminal. in other words, you do not need to talk to me about it again. he is a hero to me because he showed that we can work across party lines. lord knows that we need to come up particularly in times like these. i want to thank one more group of people and then i will sit down. i want to thank the people in the state of california who voted for nearly $10 billion in state funds to support high speed rail. that is why our state is so great, because the people of the state. we are going to keep the state moving forward. thank
bay area, california, and washington, d.c., who worked with us to make this happen. many are here today and others in spirit. thank you all. we made it. the grand central station of the west coast is starting construction. [applause] thank you. now, i would like to introduce our first speaker, the chairman of our board, nathaniel ford. he serves as the chair of the transbay joint powers authority and the executive director of the municipal transportation agency. he also sits on the caltrain board of directors. he has been a strong supporter of the project since its arrival, and we are deeply grateful for his leadership and guidance. chairman ford. [applause] >> thank you, maria. good morning, everyone. today is a great day, and we thank you for coming to our ceremony. i say our ceremony because it took all of us to pull this together, all of our hard work. those of you who contributed over the decade, a long effort to end at today culminating in a groundbreaking for our new transit center. there are many people that we should mention today and give a little bit of perspective in t
] >> thank yo welcome, and thank you to taking the time to join us as we celebrate and have the official celebration of asian pacific american heritage month. the theme of this year's celebration is celebrate heritage, celebrate community. looking around this room, i know the lights are dim, but many of us in asian pacific american communities may look alike to others. but we all know that the community is truly diverse. according to census information, this community is made up of over 50 ethnic groups, and many of them have made san francisco their home. there is so much to appreciate in eachest nick culture and so much to celebrate when the community comes together as one, and thus the spirit of our celebration every year. >> the members of this economy think about how do we celebrate community, what came to our mind are all the community centers throughout the city and county of san francisco that has been serving the asian pacific american community. these are places where communities gather for services and programs or just to have fun with each other, have a good time. in other wo
assemble, make sure you have, at least one person has something here that you guys can all use. different types of buildings are in the city. we have wood, unreinforced masonry, you have high rise and you have tilt ups. what's the safest construction type to be? four stories or less. wood? yeah, wood framed building. why is wood the safest building to be in, 4 stories or less? it flexes, yeah, it's flexible. what's the danger here? chimney, yeah, fireplace. be aware of the fact that just because it's a wood building and the event caused some sort of compromise of the structure of the building and the building is still standing doesn't necessarily mean there's not a danger there. so what could you as nert's do to make that situation better or at least keep it the same so no one else gets hurt? keep it off, yeah. keep people away. perfect. take out some of that yellow tape that you have, that yellow caution tape, and string it around around keep people back. in this particular case, what could you do to make that situation better? turn off the gas. where would you turn the gas off at? at th
million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations t
diplomatic relations between the u.s. and japan. we had the privilege of being there is a couple of years back to celebrate the 50th anniversary. if you walk into the international room, you will see that the mayor from a sock and had not been enlarged robot celebrating the 50th anniversary. since then, 17 others have been established. this is number 18. we recently celebrated some significant milestones. 38th anniversary of our shanghai sister city. that was a significant moment, in terms of the relationship, again not just our two cities, but both countries. the first formal relations between the two countries were formed through that sister city bond. we had the opportunity to go to !bed alarm as our first trip bak there. we established a sister region between bangalore and the san francisco area. there was a delegation of leaders who went back there. obviously connected to china and asia. we felt like it needed to incorporate india. that brings us here, this 18th finding of a sister city that celebrates the contribution and connection between spain and the that it states, between the
like to thank the judges and the committee members for giving this award to us. and we would also like to thank the person who nominated us for this award. he is a very generous gentleman who donated his bone marrow to one of our patients. the donor program is a 20-year-old nonprofit organization that helps leukemia and other blood cancer patients to find their bone marrow matches. over the past 20 years we have recruited over 130,000 donors. it seems like a big number, but it is not enough. in the registry in the united states there are seven million registered don't years, and only 7% is asian american. because bone marrow is matched based on ethnicity, it is difficult for asian americans to find a match. if you haven't registered as a donor yet. take five minutes to do so. all you need to do is fill out a form and give a cheek swab sample. you don't even need to give blood. if your cheek sample matches, we will do another test to make sure you are the best match. so please take five minutes of your time and register today. we will continue our efforts to serve the community. thank y
workers, we see it all the time. but we have a word we use, professional. we try to be professional around people that have suffered a loss like this because they don't want us to come -- you don't want to go into somebody's house and be joking and having a good time. it's unprofessional. when you are dealing with somebody who has a loss like this, just think of the word professional. that's what we try to do. this sort of body language here, she's trying to comfort here, do you think she's buying it? not with that body language. she's not really buying it. some people won't. some people will never be the same. like that thing with katrina, some people are really good but you can tell just under the surface that they are a wreck. give them space, try to be professional, try to comfort them if you can, but some people won't let you. and don't take it personal. that's the main thing, just don't take it personal. sometimes people just can't be helped. they are not mad at you, they don't hate you, you are trying to help them. they probably understand that, but they have suffered a terrific los
have to get beyond what you're used to. as long as people recognize they're moving to the desert and give up this notion that they have to bring eastern vegetation with them and make the necessary adaptations in their own life, desert communities can continue to live. man: the biggest water user in the desert is turf. turf uses a lot of irrigation and uses spray irrigation, so what we've done here is use artificial turf. you're never going to be able to achieve the look of back east or the look of, say, california, with subtropical plants, but our landscapes are still lush and use about 30% of what the subtropical landscape with turf would use. las vegas has adopted a drought tolerant ordinance. we're using less water today than we used five years ago, despite over 300,000 new residents. i think it's a pretty amazing example as to how a town can really turn on a dime if there's the political will and if the public gets behind it. narrator: even the casinos and resorts have adapted to efficient water use. mulroy: the las vegas strip uses only 3% of all the water that we deliver. a
. and other states. i think some of the best where you used to be in new mexico. they're doing a lot of that. that's correct. and these-these models really recognize the science, that the components of a person's life don't exist in-in a vacuum, nor do the components of a system exist in a vacuum. and recovery really, and frankly prevention as well, really has to do with multiple dimensions at the same time, sustained over time. and so that's the kind of system of care approach. very good. james, i want to go back to, for you to be able to tell us, you have done such a great job of getting individuals, of providing for individuals that second chance. can you tell us about the business that you started and how it's helping individuals that are in recovery? well, the business i started is a company i started, it's called the choice is yours, inc. and that was developed from a conversation with my sponsor on the phone trying to find a name for a company, and he, his frustration with me grew, so he said, "i'm going to bed, james. the choice is yours." and so it came about because of his frustrat
for everything you have done for us. [applause] [applause] >> thank you. i am almost speechless for this honor, an honor which actually i never sought, and i am humbled receiving. it has been my great privilege to be able to work in this city, and in the spirit of the theme of tonight, which is headed and unity, i need to emphasize the issue of heritage. first of all, like at the academy, and i'm waiting 40 lights to go off shortly, i do want to thank my parents, both of whom not only had the good foresight to have me born in san francisco in a chinese hospital, but also within the city here had shown me that there was more than just work, as they have themselves tirelessly worked within the community and the county here. i also want to thank, of course, my own family who gave me the opportunity, the time to be able to work within my own community and on different levels as the opportunity arose. lastly, i would like particularly to acknowledge that what -- that none of what was read could actually be possible by only one person and i was merely the steward of an issue that chinese hospital ha
of us who can get it are people with health insurance. anyone will tell you on the street we need residential drug treatment. take some of these dam presence, take down the gun towers, turned into a residential drug treatment centers -- some of these damned prisons. >> what are your suggestions as to the reform? one area we have not really talked about much is the impact of technology. where is that going now, and how do we need to expend that? how do we deal with the information that is being disseminated, how do we slow that down? are there other areas that also are bleeding into employment and housing, and what is the solution, is my question? he>> there has been a real leadership on the country to come up with smarter ideas, and we have had a lot of good examples and policies, state and federal for the past 10 years or so, so the reform agenda is not that big a secret. they have been a lot of reports that put it together in one place. i think the real challenge that has been touched on is really leadership, and a lot of it has to do with leadership and people really stepping u
the kids and the parents. so we weren't, we used to bring math classes over to chez panisse and feed them lunch. the teachers were having a meeting and i wanted them to incorporate these ideas. we had to feed them to them. we invited the principals for dinner and lunch. it was all through drawing them in through a pleasurable experience. once you get hooked, you see, on the flavors, you give very willingly. [laughter]. >> i want to get to soul food in a second. how do you answer? you pick a carrot? what is the education? what is the narrative? >> the math teachers bring their kids out into the garden. >> math? >> math, into the garden, we have a couple they decide they are measuring the beds. the kids are having a good time doing this thing because they were in their boots in the grass and picking a couple of ras berries on the way. hands on education is a way to really make an impression and have the education. so they are doing that. they are counting snails. >> counting snails. >> you know, there are so many ways. how many buckets of water does it take to water the bed? it is just very
raise awareness of alcohol and drug use disorders and highlight the effectiveness of treatment. in order to help you plan events and activities in commemoration of this year's recovery month observance, the free recovery month kit offers ideas, materials, and tools for planning, organizing, and realizing an event or outreach campaign that matches your goals and resources. to obtain your copy of this year's recovery month kit and gain access to other free publications and materials related to addiction treatment and recovery issues, visit the recovery month web site at www.recoverymonth.gov or call 1-800-622-help. it's important that everyone become involved because addiction is our nation's number one health problem and treatment is our best tool to address it. second installment of city eaks. it is a series of discussions on policy issues and pollutions affecting the city of san francisco. about a month and a half ago we had the discussion. we have 2 wonderful conversationalist and more details on their bios on your programs. by way of introduction, alice waters is the founder and owner
washing and who among us don't have a nick or a cut on their hand and are you going to touch someone's blood and your in tac skin will protect you from most ilknows. however, if you have a cut on your hand you have a path for infection to get inside of you and you want a pair of latex gloves -- several pairs of glo gloves that you can put on and change as you go from patient t patient hopefully and at least wash your hands and disinfect your hands between patient contacts and the eyes are like an open wound and path to get into your body and glasses and take the old glasses and throw them in your kit and you have something to wear and face mask and of course dust and dirt and all of these disasters throw up dust and dirt and especially in a dryer season and push comes t shove a band da bandana. and after a disaster is not the time to let your hygiene slip and it's a time to tighten it u and communitycable diseases and if it's wet and not yours don't touch it. gloves and every patient contac and don't touch blood and it's good rule to live by. hepatitis a and sal min nillia and geria
can tell us what is "ordinary injustice" and how does it manifest itself? >> ordinary injustice happens in a courtroom where there are smart, committed, hard-working people, professionals. but they are routinely acting in ways that fall short. what it is that people and their positions are supposed to be doing. and they don't even realize that anything is missing or that their behavior has devastating consequences for regular people's lives. so this is really the meaning of ordinary injustice that mistakes become routine and the legal professionals can no longer see their role in them. >> can you give us some examples of what you found in your eight-year saga of studying the court system? >> sure. the best way to perhaps get into it is to tell you how i first came across it. i had just graduated law school from stanford and i had clerked for a federal appellate judge in miami and the jurisdiction was florida, alabama and georgia and i wrote a story after my clerkship for the "nation" magazine and it was picked up everywhere. they said if you can do this again, we'll give you a y
new york is the most densely populated city in the u.s. and over 40 million tourists visit the city every year. the 1.3 billion gallons of water required every day are delivered by a system of extraordinary scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. bui
from the court to the prosecutors, he had never seen a case that has seen more of use in his career. attorney general holder was right in terms of acting swiftly, in terms of throwing out that condition. he also stated that the department of justice's office of professional responsibility would investigate the actions of the two officers, yet a year after that, we still have heard nothing out of office regarding their conduct. the department of justice has publicly talked about how they increased training in terms of discovery obligations, and they have issued memos in terms of what they are supposed to be doing, yet they have yet to do anything regarding the behavior of those prosecutors. contrast that to the case that occurred a couple years ago, that boasts -- that of the prosecutor in north carolina, where six months after the charges were brought against the lacrosse students, and they were charged with rape, the defense attorneys uncovered evidence in the files, and north carolina is open, but they found evidence in the files showing their clients were innocent. the state atto
it over, and the judges were telling us, you are making a mountain out of a molehill. little did we know there was all this bubbling underneath, so it is true the onus of the burden is on the defense, because once we have the information we have to file the motion. it is a tremendous amount of work we have to do, but what we need to do is make sure there is a process so people who were convicted can bring their cases back to court. our next question from the audience says, in santa clara county when people plead guilty to misdemeanors, what happened? did they go to jail? for how long? what type of crimes? >> one of the chief dynamics that was happening was that many people were faced with a choice between staying in jail sometimes up to a week or even longer waiting for a public defender to get to their case for just to get out right fair, -- right there, because the judge was basically saying, plead guilty. what is the big deal? that was the impression. everybody was taking the deal. you could almost see them talking to each other. you could see them make that decision. any pointed out
should always be proud of what it is that we do for people and in fact, what they return to us. we are made better by the work that we do and may god bless all of your efforts. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, jose. the event today is also sponsored by the california attorneys for criminal justice. i also want to especially thank the rosenberg foundation and executive director tim solard who provided a grant to make this possible so thank you so much the rosenberg foundation and of course i want to thank all the volunteers who worked so hard to make this event happen today. now i'm very excited to introduce our keynote speaker. our keynote speaker is and was the first "lady lawyer" in california. it's true. because when she decided that she wanted to become a lawyer, there was one problem, the law in california didn't allow it. and so she had to change the law, which she did. she also wanted to go to law school right here at hastings college of law but they had a policy that said only men could go do that law school so she sued hastings college of the law and she changed that an
in that courtroom. what happens later is when they go to prison. >> could you tell us some of the barriers you faced from the transition from prison into the community? >> when you get a prison, now, there is no date money. they all walked out in many states in their prison uniforms, with a number across their chests. it is really a miracle they do not get shot as escapees. they are coming home to the community with no winter clothes, no eyeglasses. they have had no medical attention in years. they are usually silver and not on drugs. usually, not always. -- they are usually sold -- sober. the idea is in prison they dry out. in prison, they are just warehouses. there is no prison programming anymore. there's no college programs -- there is one in san clinton here, thanks to the people of your community, but that is one of the few in the country, the one you have at san quentin. so all they could get is a ged in general. they come out with no date money, no clothes. none of them have jobs when they get out. and they come home to what? when they have been locked up 5, 10, 20 years, they go home, and t
in the apartment building with us. i had aunts upstairs. another aunt lived close by. pretty much 4 days a week my great uncle would come in and visit all of these people my uncle, my grand mother and so forth, all were from a town land called outside of robin. when i was growing up i would hear the names. and they would conjure the sense of another world i was no longer a part of but was connected to. i think the -- i came to the brink of this sort of, you know, really quest gradualy by hearing the names. the other experience i had when i was growing up is music in my grand mother's house. my grand mother live on the first floor of the apartment building the door was open. everyone in the apartment building stopped there after work. they would stop for a drink and play polka, not polka, poker. and lynched to john gibbons play an accordion on his wooden leg. you had the sense of people having come over if not in mass by a great number to this other place with a kind of echo of that place being transposed into the world that became my world. so that of my mother's side of the family. my father's si
>> [applause]. we have a very special guest. [inaudible] is here with us tonight. [inaudible] dancing. step dancing which we are familiar with. you may have seen this before. this will be a treat. [applause]. >> someone once told me this was from scandanavia. this is a different version. about 2 sisters that fall in love with the same guy. it didn't work out too well. one of the sisters throws another one into the raging water. he fashions her body into a fiddle, into a violin. this is the actual violin. i love her so much. [singing] [music playing] [applause] [music playing] [applause] knew >> we are going to finish off a with [inaudible]. yeah. [applause]. [music playing]. >> [applause]. >> [applause]. >> i want first to introduce margaret cooley who writes nonfiction and poetry. also with us from boston but having stepped off the plain from dublina daniel to be lynn a writer at emer son college. i want to start by reflecting back that those of you folks endeavored to reveal hidden histories of your family lives. we have spoken in advanced of today's conversation. it's cle
about maintaining resiliency and sustaining recovery. joining us in our panel today are pamela s. hyde, administrator, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland; dr. a. thomas mclennan, deputy director, white house office of national drug control policy, washington, d.c.; dr. alexandre laudet, addiction and recovery scientist, new york, new york; james smallwood, founder and ceo, the choice is yours, inc., camden, new jersey. pam, how many people in the united states are in recovery? well, the estimates are about 20 million people are in recovery, working on being free of drugs and other-and alcohol. and, alexandre, what is recovery? what are some of the common paths to recovery? well, that's really two different questions. what recovery is, according to people in recovery themselves, is usually, especially for people severely addicted, it is abstinence from drugs and alcohol, as well as significantly-significant improvements in other aspects that constitute quality of life, such as employment, social re
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